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PostSubject: Red Eyed Tree Frog   Tue Mar 04, 2008 8:19 pm

Iv done some reading up on this guy study

Red Eyed Tree Frog

Description:
Red Eyed Tree frogs have bright red eyes and are a really bright color of green with blue and yellow stripped sides. They also have funny looking orange toes.

Habitat:
This species tends to do better in a community. The Arboreal Tanks are the best bet for these guys. Oh, and also be sure to provide a means for them to get out of the water pond if they fall in.While they can swim, providing a branch or something is generally a good idea.
The temperature should be about 78-85 during the day and about any where from 66 to 77 at night. The humidity should be kept around 80-100%.

Diet:
Like most frogs...they will eat fly's, moths, grasshoppers, possibly other small frogs and crickets too.




This article is not the best in the world as im not very knowledgeable with frogs, but i am thinking about getting this frog.

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PostSubject: Red Eyed Tree Frog (article 2)   Mon Mar 24, 2008 6:26 pm


Common Name: Red-eyed Tree Frog, Beautiful Tree Nymph.
Scientific Name: Agalychnis callidryas.
Distribution: Southern Mexico, south to eastern Panama.
Size: The females of this species often attain a Snout-to-vent length of up to 7cm, the males usually slightly smaller reaching 5.5cm.
Sexing: A sure sign of a male is if it can be heard calling, the males also develop nuptial pads on the inside of the thumbs during the breeding season. Females tend to be larger and have more truncated snouts.
Varieties: The colouration of these frogs varies slightly through out their range. In the northern part of their range around south Mexico and Guatemala the Red-eyed Tree Frogs tend to be slightly smaller and show light blue colour on their flanks. Frogs from the southern part of their range (Nicaragua and Costa Rica) are often larger and the flanks turn to a darker shade of blue. Some individuals have small white spots on their backs, and the colour of their feet can range from light yellow to a deep orange. The creamy yellow stripes present along their flanks can also vary with their geographical range, varying from thin lines close together to thick lines spread further apart, these lines may even be joined at the top or bottom with lateral lines. A Xanthic form is now commonly available in the US pet trade.
Requirements: Being a rather active species they require quite a spacious terrarium. A 20-gallon tank would be ideal for a pair of adults. They require a tropical woodland type set up with a substrate of either bark chips or topsoil covered with a layer of live moss. The tank can be furnished with a selection of logs, cork bark, and sturdy leafed live plants. These items should be arranged in such a way that they provide a number of climbing, perching and hiding areas for the frogs. A medium sized water bowl (no deeper than the frog's height at rest) should be provided with clean de-chlorinated or spring water which will need changing daily so as to avoid the risk of ammonia and bacteria building up in the water. The enclosure will need to be heated to a daytime temperature of 26-28C with a drop at night to 20-22C. This can be done using an under tank heat-mat controlled by a thermostat. Spot bulbs / heat lamps are not recommended for use with amphibians and so a fluorescent UVB tube should be provided as a light source. The tank should be visually inspected daily and any soiled items should be removed, cleaned and replaced, if this is done at the same time as changing the water it will cause less disturbance to the frogs. Once every two-three weeks the tank and its contents should be completely cleaned and sterilised using an amphibian / reptile safe disinfectant.
Feeding: Young Red-eyes should be fed daily with a mixture of suitably sized insects including fruitflies, curly flies, and small crickets. These food items should be dusted with a calcium and vitamin supplement two-three times a week. Adult Red-eyes will take considerably larger insects including adult crickets, locusts, flour beetles, moths, and curly flies. They should be fed every two-three days and the insects dusted with calcium and vitamin supplements once a week.

Article thanks to "Reptile Rescue Den"

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